Cesaro uses a variation called the Neutralizer where he grapevines the opponent's leg with his arm similar to a cradle piledriver. From this position the attacking wrestler bends over, flipping the opponent over their head and slamming them down to the mat face-first. A facebuster, also known as a faceplant, is generally a takedown move in professional wrestling in which an attacking wrestler forces his/her opponent down to the mat face-first without involving a headlock or facelock. The arm that has the hand on the back of the neck may hook the opponent's arm. She begins with her opponent in an inverted facelock, then grabs one of the opponents arms and pulls, rotating the opponent so that the front of the body faces the mat and is in between her legs, finally driving down to the mat and ending in a facebuster. Awesome Kong uses a kneeling version as her finisher, known as the Implant Buster. The move is named after the innovator of the original Gory special, Gory Guerrero. [1][2] Braun Strowman rarely uses this move as his finisher. This maneuver was popularized by Melina. The wrestler then places their head next to the opponent's back and turns 180 degrees while twisting one of the opponent's arms over both of their heads. Another variation of this move is to grab the opponent by the hair, perform the same jump and landing but lift only the opponent's head, giving a harder effect when the opponent's face is driven into the mat. WWE Recommended for you Madison Rayne uses this as one of her signature moves. Copyright fingerprint 8a04bd16c6cccb8b7f79070bcab9aaa4, "Caldwell's WWE No Way Out report 2/17: Ongoing "virtual time" coverage of PPV", "Superstars: Henry looks for revenge of Usos". In another variation the wrestler could just jump from the turnbuckle grabbing the opponent's head/hair in the air and planting them to the mat. Innovated by Gran Apache, this facebuster is performed when a wrestler bends an opponent forward, placing the opponent's head between the wrestler's legs (a standing head scissors), and hooks each of the opponent's arms behind their back. Juice Robinson uses a jumping variation, calling it Pulp Friction. The wrestler approaches the opponent from behind, and lifts them onto their shoulders into a seated position, the electric chair. The attacking wrestler next hooks the opponent's near leg and throws themselves forwards, driving the opponent face-first into the ground. This facebuster variation sees a wrestler lift an opponent up in a fireman's carry across their shoulders, then throw the opponent's legs out in front of them to spin them out, while simultaneously falling backwards or forwards, causing the opponent to land on their face and upper body. Another similar version of the Pedigree was used by Seth Rollins, where he would release his opponent during the fall, while a sitout version, known as In Yo' Face, is the name Velvet Sky gave to the move as her finisher. The wrestler performs a kneeling or sitout facebuster. Also described as an over the shoulder facebuster or an inverted snapmare into a facebuster. The wrestler then pulls back on the opponent's arms, lifting them up so that the opponent is held upside-down facing in the same direction as the wrestler, as if the wrestler was preparing for a double underhook piledriver. A variant, sees the wrestler lift the opponent's legs around their waist before placing both hands around the opponent's waist and lifting them into a wheelbarrow position. Former WWE wrestler Tyler Reks used the move as the Burning Hammer (not be confused with the variation innovated by Kenta Kobashi) on rare occasions. Often instead of straight push ups, the attacking wrestler just bounces their legs up and down to create the effect. The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. Chyna later adopted the move from Triple H and began using it as a finisher. The wrestler then lifts the opponent up, releases the hand holding the front of the opponent's neck, and pushes forward to slam the opponent to the mat face-first with the other hand. The move is named after the innovator of the original Gory special, Gory Guerrero. The wrestler approaches the opponent from behind, and lifts them onto their shoulders into a seated position, the electric chair. Brooke Tessmacher used this as her finisher and called it the Tess-Shocker. The wrestler then lifts the opponent up, releases the hand holding the front of the opponent's neck, and pushes forward to slam the opponent to the mat face-first with the other hand. Styles performs the maneuver with a variation, as seen in the photos to the right: he does not hook the opponent's arms before performing the slam, but takes two steps and moves his legs in front of the opponent's arms, enabling him to use his legs to cover the shoulders for a pin. This maneuver was popularized by Christopher Daniels, who uses a spinning sit-out version of the move and calls it the Angel's Wings. Former WWE wrestler Tyler Reks used the move as the Burning Hammer (not be confused with the variation innovated by Kenta Kobashi) on rare occasions. A sit-out variation of this move exists. The attacking wrestler stands behind, slightly to one side of and facing the opponent before reaching under the opponent's arms with their own corresponding arms and places the palms of their hands on the neck of the opponent, thereby forcing the opponent's arms up into the air (as in a full nelson hold).