Article last revised on November 19, 2018 by Rowan Allen. The Japanese wind god Fūjin, Sōtatsu, 17th century. If you wish to use our material in your essay, book, article, website or project, please consult our permissions page. Please do not copy without permission. Alternative names: Kamikaze, Kaze-No-Kami, Gender: Male Celebration or Feast Day: Unknown at present, In charge of: Wind

To purchase such goodies we suggest you try Amazon, Ebay or other reputable online stores. Ever since then, Kami-Kaze has been the go-to god for defeating the enemy. Gaoh: Iroquois spirit master of the winds. Examples: JUPITER, JUP, JUPI. We are often asked about mythology merchandise. For all media enquiries please contact us here. This ancient deity stands on mountain tops with his white beard swirling and his wind banner whipping every which way.

"Wind God") or Futen is the Japanese god of the wind and one of the eldest Shinto gods.

One of the oldest Japanese deities, Raijin is an original Shinto god, also known as kaminari (from kami “spirit” or “deity” and nari “thunder"). His bag of air moves all the world’s winds, and he is a powerful force of nature alongside his brother, the thunder god Raijin. Fūjin (風神, lit. Celebration or Feast Day: Unknown at present, In charge of: Wind Area of expertise: Wind, Good/Evil Rating: NEUTRAL, may not care He is buffeted and under pressure. In Japanese art, the deity is often depicted together with Raijin, the god of lightning, thunder and storms. Do we sell Kami-Kaze graphic novels, books, video or role-playing games (RPG)? BBCODE: To link to this page in a forum post or comment box, just copy and paste the link code below: Here's the info you need to cite this page. (Copyright notice.) Just copy the text in the box below.

Fujin (風神) is the Japanese god of the wind, a popular and terrifying demon. He is portrayed as a terrifying wizardly demon, resembling a red-headed green-skinned humanoid wearing a leopard skin, carrying a large bag of winds on his shoulders. Alternative names: Futen, Gender: Male According to Japanese legend, the Kamikaze (divine wind) was created by Raijin, god of lightning, thunder, and storms, to protect Japan against the Mongols. Try entering just the first three or four letters. Kaikias: The Greek god of the north-east wind. Consider donating a few pennies to the Godchecker Temple Roof Fund. However, this time around, the wind was definitely blowing in the wrong direction. Popularity index: 1428. Raijin is one of the most important gods in Japanese mythology and one scary-looking guy. The god of wind is colored in green and carries on his shoulders a large bag full with winds. Name: Kami-Kaze Hotoru: Pawnee wind god Kahit: Native American (Kahit) wind god. If you wish to use our material in your essay, book, article, website or project, please consult our permissions page. Found this site useful?
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Starting with the Hellenistic period when Greece occupied parts of Central Asia and India, the Greek wind god Boreas became the god Oado in Bactrian Greco-Buddhist art, then a wind deity in China (frescoes of the Tarim Basin), and finally the Japanese Wind God Fujin.[1]. A God of Divine Wind A fearsome storm deity, he has a tendency to cause havoc with destructive typhoons. Just copy the text in the box below. A surprisingly stylish deity, he wears a fetching leopard skin costume and wind-filled shoulder bags. When he opens the bag, the winds are set free, creating storms… like the one said to protect Japan against the fleet of Kublai Khan - kamikaze, the divine wind. The wind god kept its symbol, the windbag, and its dishevelled appearance throughout this evolution.

God of the Wind Fujin. Editors: Peter J. Allen, Chas Saunders.

Pronunciation: Coming soon

Guabancex: Native American (Taino) storm goddess ("Lady of the Winds") Harpyiai: Greek Daimons of whirlwinds and storm gusts. Try entering just the first three or four letters. HTML: To link to this page, just copy and paste the link below into your blog, web page or email.