The poem, a ballad, describes the execution of a British soldier in India for murder. The regiment’s in column, an’ they’re marchin’ us away; [5] T. S. Eliot noted the imperfect rhyme scheme – parade and said do not quite rhyme – as strongly contributing to this effect, with the slight interruption supporting the feel of a large number of men marching together, not quite in harmony. It received wide critical and popular acclaim, and is often regarded as one of the most significant pieces of Kipling's early verse. Dear friends, Thank you for helping us build a comprehensive online archive of American song. Kipling himself was fond of singing his poetry, of writing it to fit the rhythm of a particular tune. The fourth verse comes to the hanging; Files sees the body against the sun, and then feels his soul as it "whimpers" overhead; the term reflects a shudder in the ranks as they watch Deever die. The Bridegroom by Alexander Pushkin; The Fish by Elizabeth Bishop; Danny Deever by Rudyard Kipling can be considered examples of a narrative poem. Here's literature at last!". It is generally read as being set in India, though it gives no details of the actual situation. In this specific case, the musical source has been suggested as the Army's "grotesque bawdy song" Barnacle Bill the Sailor, but it is possible that some other popular tune of the period was used. Nine 'undred of 'is county an' the Regiment's disgrace,[4]. "I've drunk 'is beer a score o' times," said Files-on-Parade. " “Danny Deever” is a description of a military execution: the hanging of a British soldier in India for the murder of another soldier in his own regiment. It received wide critical and popular acclaim, and is often regarded as one of the most significant pieces of Kipling's early verse. While the militaristic accompaniment helps distinguish the Color Sergeant from the soldier, the performer must differentiate between these two characters in order for the narrative to be effective. 'Is cot was right-'and cot to mine," said Files-on-Parade. " While they’re hangin’ Danny Deever in the mornin’. Though the Barrack-Room Ballads have made this appear a common feature of Kipling's work, at the time it was quite unusual; this was the first of his published works to be written in the voice of the common soldier. It is generally read as being set in India, though it gives no details of the actual situation. “It’s Danny’s soul that’s passin’ now”, the Colour-Sergeant said. Kipling’s poem describes the hanging of Danny Deever, a British combatant sentenced to death for murdering another soldier. “What makes that front-rank man fall down?” said Files-on-Parade. To date, at least a dozen published recordings are known, made from 1893 to 1985. It was later commented on by William Butler Yeats, who noted that "[Kipling] interests a critical audience today by the grotesque tragedy of Danny Deever". His execution is viewed by his regiment, paraded to watch it, and the poem is composed of the … For they’re hangin’ Danny Deever, you can hear the Dead March play, T. S. Eliot included the poem in his 1941 collection A Choice of Kipling's Verse. T. S. Eliot called the poem "technically (as well as in content) remarkable", holding it up as one of the best of Kipling's ballads.