They also tend to be more skilled. In comparison to the declining support of media outlets during the 1960s and 1970s, professional wrestling, notably the emerging World Wrestling Federation (WWF; abridged from WWWF in 1979), received great exposure through its reappearance on network television. Every town of note had a show at least once a month, and at some points more than 30 cities had a weekly date. Pro wrestling as we know it has been around for over 100 years and was made popular in the U.S. Throughout the 1990s, professional wrestling achieved highs in both viewership and financial success during a time of fierce competition among competing promotions, such as World Wrestling Federation and World Championship Wrestling. In order for them to stay atop of their competition, they would often sabotage and raid other nearby promoters of their talent. This would lead us to a new chapter in wrestling history. It was because of the concerns for the business pro wrestling, would embark on its most important decision. The history of professional wrestling, as a performing art, started in the early 20th century, with predecessors in funfair and variety strongman and wrestling performances (which often involved match fixing) in the 19th century. Like many great ideas, sometimes what looks good on paper always isn’t so. [10] Stecher and Lewis agreed to a unification match years later, in 1928, when Stecher gave in and lost the title to Lewis. Far worse for Joint Promotions, however, was that with their contract up, they were forced to share the TV rights as part of a rotation system with All Star Promotions and America's World Wrestling Federation (WWF). They were competing with local promotions all over the country now. This encyclopedic work features reports on over 1,500 wrestling shows that took place during 1930 to 1985. While wrestling continued to grow in popularity, promoters were making more money. Things would start to go sour shortly after though. The Monday Night Wars began in 1995, when WCW started Monday Nitro, a show that ran directly against Monday Night Raw. [1] Wrestling exhibits during the late 19th century were also shown across the United States in countless "athletic shows" (or "at shows"), where experienced wrestlers offered open challenges to the audience. [15] The remaining televised wrestling promoters had small, local syndicated shows, which network producers placed as late-night and Saturday and/or Sunday morning/afternoon fillers rather than signature programming. Wrestlers could no longer travel to a new market and establish a new persona, since fans there already knew who they were. The WWF, however, rebounded after André the Giant became the company's top superstar when he joined the company in 1973. If you want to be precise on the matter, it started in late 1800’s shortly after the Civil War. Televised wrestling allowed wrestlers to become household names and allowing personality to get a wrestler over just as much as size. Click Pro Wrestling Bibliography to see an extensive list of titles on the history of professional wrestling in book list format (available in MLA and APA formats by request). [7] Their business succeeded quickly, gaining popularity for its freshness and unique approach to wrestling; a traveling stable of wrestlers. Grand circuses included wrestling exhibitions, quickly enhancing them through colorful costumes and fictional biographies for entertainment, disregarding their competitive nature. Hooks are illegal in conventional amateur wrestling, but have high rates of success against even the most athletic and experienced of competitors, essentially removing rules from professional wrestling. This fate would be no different for the three. The AWA was no longer the top promotion after the WWWF rejoined the NWA. In comparison to the declining support of media outlets during the 1960s and 1970s, professional wrestling, notably the emerging World Wrestling Federation (WWF; abridged from WWWF in 1979), received great exposure through its reappearance on network television. Professional wrestling, in the sense of traveling performers paid for mass entertainment in staged matches, began in the post-Civil War period in the late 1860s and 1870s.