The name might be unfamiliar, but many diners would recognise the delicacy served at restaurants as "shark head". However, Cites only regulates international trade. The shovelnose ray is currently listed in the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) Appendix II, which restricts international trade of the species. | According to ST, this ruling will take effect 90 days from when the species was listed on the Cites Appendix. Cloud hosting by Vodien. Aside from the shovelnose rays — also known as the bottlenose wedgefish, with the technical name Rhynchobatus australiae — 17 other shark and ray species are classified under Appendix II of Cites as critically endangered. NParks has been visiting fishery ports and have issued advisories on the imports and sales of rays, and have informed the merchants on the penalties for non-compliances. The critically endangered shovelnose ray appears to be sold in markets in Choa Chu Kang and Bukit Gombak. It is listed as Vulnerable by the IUCN Red List due to the frequent use of demersal tangle nets. Heavy penalties are also put in place for those illegally importing or exporting Cites-listed species. Additionally, all the stalls there had reportedly sold all their rays within two hours of opening. Web development by Ripplewerkz. It was classified as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). 5, 2020, NParks told Mothership: After receiving feedback about the sale of shovelnose rays at wet markets in Choa Chu Kang and Bukit Gombak, the National Parks Board conducted thorough investigations on the matter. “Both rays and sharks live in shallow sandbanks and these places are where most coastal fishing take place,” said Hutchinson. SINGAPORE — Food lovers who enjoy a delicacy called “shark head” in Singapore restaurants may want to think again as the animal has just been classified as critically endangered. Tell your local restaurant, fishing kakis and boat captains about this, so that they are aware that the Shovelnose Ray is now listed by the IUCN as being Critically Endangered. Australia, Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Vietnam, This article is only an excerpt. In a restaurant, the head of the shovelnose ray can fetch up to S$88 per kilo (US$63 per kilo), such that the dish can cost US$440 and upwards. All rights reserved. Singapore saw a total of 292 imported Covid-19 cases (non-Singaporeans) in the five months between April 1 and August 31. | The new classification of the shovelnose ray hasn't come soon enough, considering that wedgefishes and guitar fishes, a group which the shovelnose rays are part of, are at high risk of extinction. Aside from the shovelnose rays — also known as the bottlenose wedgefish, with the technical name Rhynchobatus australiae — 17 other shark and ray species are classified under Appendix II of Cites as critically endangered. Many of the dormitory residents have never been infected, which makes them susceptible to Covid-19, said Manpower Minister Josephine Teo. Contact us The IUCN has just classified the Rhynchobatus australiae, or Bottlenose Wedgefish, locally referred to as the Shovelnose ray - as Critically Endangered. More to come soon. A letter of warning was issued to the merchant as the CITES listing only recently came into effect in November 2019 and the merchant was a first-time offender. Virtually nothing is known about the biology and ecology of the spotted shovelnose ray. Some Singaporeans would undoubtedly have tried "shark head", an exotic-sounding dish served in some restaurants here. We Are Hiring Named after their distinctive broad and pointed snout, the ray is native to various parts of Southeast Asia, Australia, and can be found in Singapore waters. The common shovelnose ray, giant shovelnose ray or giant guitarfish (Glaucostegus typus) is a species of fish in the Rhinobatidae family found in the central Indo-Pacific, ranging from India to the East China Sea, Solomon Islands and northern Australia. The Giant shovelnose ray is probably the most commercially-fished guitarfish in the Western Pacific. On Aug. 28, 2019, the species was accorded a higher level of protection. Let's not fish or eat the Shovelnose Ray to Extinction. Sheng Siong and NTUC FairPrice have not responded. There were 34 new cases, 3 of which were from the community.