"Strange Fits of Passion Have I Known" Analysis William Wordsworth Characters archetypes. He crossed a lea, passed through an orchard, and began to climb a hill, atop which was Lucy's cottage. In the poem, the speaker narrates a night time ride to the cottage of his beloved Lucy, who always looks as "fresh as a rose in June". The poem has a very regular rhyme scheme and is in a simple ballad form. I read it everyday. Each of its seven stanzas is four lines long and has a rhyming scheme of a-b-a-b. ? Please add me on youtube. Wordsworth then creates tension by juxtaposing the sinking moon and the approaching rider, the familiar landscape with the speaker's strange, dreamy feelings. This page was last edited on 19 August 2020, at 01:33. About the Poem: The poem “Strange Fits of Passion Have I Known”, belongs to the Lucy poems series (a collection of 5 poems), which was included in The Lyrical Ballads. In the five following stanzas, he recounts how he wended his way on horseback "beneath an evening-moon". This poem has not been translated into any other language yet. Those paths so dear to me epitomizes romanticism at best of best. Yes! As he "came near, and nearer still" to "Lucy's cot", the sinking moon appeared to follow suit. This gives the poem a propulsive, musical feeling. When she I loved looked every day Fresh as a rose in June, I to her cottage bent my way, Beneath an evening-moon. bravo. Abrams, ed. STRANGE fits of passion have I known: And I will dare to tell, But in the Lover's ear alone, What once to me befell. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1965. It is quite understandable that in his race to beat the moon to her cot, he thinks of life of fragile. All information has been reproduced here for educational and informational purposes to benefit site visitors, and is provided at no charge... Recite this poem (upload your own video or voice file). 2. For I believe he rushes for two reasons. It's true. An earlier version of this poem ended with an extra verse: M.H. Strange fits of passion have I known:And I will dare to tell,But in the lover's ear alone,What once to me befell.When she I loved looked every dayFresh as a rose in June,I to her cottage bent my way,Beneath an evening-moon.Upon the moon I fixed my eye,All over the wide lea;With quickening pace my horse drew nighThose paths so dear to me.And now we reached the orchard-plot;And, as we climbed the hill,The sinking moon to Lucy's cotCame near, and nearer still.In one of those sweet dreams I slept,Kind Nature's gentlest boon!And all the while my eye I keptOn the descending moon.My horse moved on; hoof after hoofHe raised, and never stopped:When down behind the cottage roof,At once, the bright moon dropped.What fond and wayward thoughts will slideInto a Lover's head! The poem is a personal recollection of emotions felt by the speaker while he travelling to the place where Lucy lived. Jones, Mark. The speaker begins by saying that he has experienced "strange fits of passion" and will recount them only to another lover ("in the Lover's ear alone, / What once to me befell."). that the one who waits may fade in sleep as truely as in morning. I maybe wrong but a nice thought when reading his work. If she is real, her surname and identity are unknown, though they have been the subject of much "diligent speculation" in literary circles. He really praises the nature very much by giving such a nature scene. The meter alternates between tetrameter and trimeter, so each four-beat line is followed by a three-beat line. Yep, the man was in love....didn't matter what he had to go through to get to his love. "The one certainty is that she is not the girl of Wordsworth's Lucy Gray."[3]. Quick fast explanatory summary. When she I loved looked every day Fresh as a rose in June, I to her cottage bent my way, Beneath an evening-moon. Composed during a sojourn in Germany in 1798, the poem was first published in the second edition of Lyrical Ballads (1800). wow. Upon the moon I fixed my eye, All over the wide lea; With quickening pace my horse drew nigh Those paths so dear to me. Why did he use? to myself I cried,'If Lucy hould be dead!'. short summary describing. A morbid thought rises unbidden to the speaker's mind: "O mercy!" Definition terms. Composed during a sojourn in Germany in 1798, the poem was first published in the second edition of Lyrical Ballads (1800). ", "Strange fits of passion have I known" is simple in form but complex in content. After reading most of the Lucy poems my interpretation is she was a short lived flower that he genuinely loved to see and showed his passion and feelings for it. The poem describes the poet's trip to his beloved Lucy's cottage, and his thoughts on the way. This is my favorite poem in the world ^^. I make free educational video tutorials on youtube such as Basic HTML and CSS. Was Lucy a living person at the time? To be alone with her, and to know she lives still. Wordsworth structures “Strange fits of passion have I known” as a ballad, a song-like poetic form with an ABAB rhyme scheme. ), New York: W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. Lines Written a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Strange_fits_of_passion_have_I_known&oldid=973752450, Short description is different from Wikidata, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. i am not sure if it a happy poem, I do not get the feeling the man is happy, it's as if he is complaigning even though he looks forward to seeing Lucy....?